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Kindred Spirits

When it comes to whisky, we take more time and care than any other distillery in Scotland. It’s the essence of Glengoyne.

When it comes to food, we look for people with the same principles – a sense of tradition and a single-minded pursuit of flavour. Like us, our Kindred Spirits choose the longer, harder way – often working by hand. Easy just doesn’t taste as good.

It’s no surprise to find that their produce goes exceptionally well with Glengoyne.

Iain Burnett

The Highland Chocolatier

What does it take to make the world’s best chocolate truffles? For Iain, the answer lies in an award-winning mix of expertise, passion, and the finest natural ingredients.

 First he trained with the master chocolatiers of the French, Swiss and Belgian schools. Then he returned to Perthshire, and spent three years perfecting his Velvet Truffle. He is uncompromising when it comes to ingredients: he sources cocoa from the volcanic slopes of São Tomé, a tiny island off the coast of Gabon. And the cream? Fresh, unblended, and Scottish – from a single herd of cows.

His richly textured truffles go exceptionally well with a dram of Glengoyne: you’ll find them on the Whisky & Chocolate Tour. But it’s his undiluted focus on natural ingredients, time-honoured craft and perfection that makes him a true Kindred Spirit.

Guy Grieve

Hand-dived scallops

There are two ways to harvest scallops. You can indiscriminately dredge the ocean floor – sacrificing quality and harming the environment. Or you can dive into the icy waters of the North Atlantic to pick them by hand.

Guy Grieve chooses the hard way – diving for up to four hours at a time, in harsh currents and unimaginable cold. Why? To deliver the finest king scallops, from sea to plate within 24 hours. All with the highest regard for the ocean’s pristine environment.

That’s what makes Guy a Kindred Spirit – his uncompromising pursuit of taste, rooted in fine traditions and a deep respect for nature.

Tricia Bey

Cheese, the time-honoured way

Like all great flavours, Tricia Bey’s cheese takes time. In fact, Tricia spends up to 13 hours a day patiently applying traditional cheese-making skills - using techniques forgotten by today’s mass producers.

She then wraps each truckle of Barwheys in traditional cotton cheesecloth – allowing the famously full taste to develop over the next 12-18 months.

Tricia’s belief in patience and tradition are what makes her a Glengoyne Kindred Spirit.